The unthinkable: Black prison inmates being recruited by Islamic terrorists

By Sinclere Lee

WASHINGTON (BNW) –
In perhaps a nightmare come true, a report released by the FBI stated that Islamic terrorists in US prisons were recruiting Black prisoners to join them. If Islamic terrorists are successful in recruiting Black inmates to their cause, it will be a hard sale for so-called “well intentioned Blacks” to defend the behavior of America against men in the Black community. Groups like al Qaeda have found US prisons fertile ground for their radical form of Islam, and Black inmates are easy targets for their recruiting.

When you mix the Islamic terrorists with the Black prison inmates, you're playing with fire, then!

Even Charles Colson of the Watergate fame called attention to the problem; in an article he stated, “I have visited over six hundred prisons the world over; in most I’ve encountered Muslims. The majority are peace-loving men who were drawn to the brotherhood and who cared only about following Islamic worship and dietary laws. But I’ve also seen thousands of angry inmates smoldering to “get even” with the society that put them behind bars. It’s these men radical Islam has in its conversion crosshairs—and it’s these men we need to worry about,” Colson explained.

Blacks inmates are easy recruits Colson believes. “In a way, I could understand. I remember from my own time in prison the despair of being locked up; not knowing how long the incarceration would last. Add to the confinement the physical deprivation, the isolation, the separation from family, the anger over the flagrant disparity in sentencing (anger justified in the case of Blacks who are sentenced more harshly for crack, their drug of choice, than are whites for the same amount or more of cocaine), the indignities visited upon the inmates—all these things feed a prisoner’s resentment, his sense of victimization.”


It was the worst case scenario that following the 9/11 attacks that the next two failed terror attacks involved people who were drawn to Islam while serving time in prisons.

Jose Padilla, now known as Abdullah al-Muhajir, the man accused of plotting to build a “dirty bomb,” had been in and out of America’s prison system, where he was influenced by Islamic inmates. Richard Reid, the failed “shoe bomber,” was converted to Islam in a British prison by a radical imam—one who was later suspended by British authorities for “inappropriate conduct.”

Both are chilling reminders of the on-going threat of terrorism. If not for the good work of our intelligence officers (and the alertness of the airline passengers who subdued Reid) we might now be adding hundreds more names to the list of American terror victims. Both cases are reminders, as well, of what fertile fields prisons are for cultivating terrorists.

That both Padilla and Reid were influenced in prison did not surprise me. I have visited over six hundred prisons the world over; in most I’ve encountered Muslims. The majority are peace-loving men who were drawn to the brotherhood and who cared only about following Islamic worship and dietary laws. But I’ve also seen thousands of angry inmates smoldering to “get even” with the society that put them behind bars. It’s these men radical Islam has in its conversion crosshairs—and it’s these men we need to worry about.

CIA Director, Porter Goss, warns of al Qaeda terror threat to U.S., so why are the cops still focusing their terror in Black America?

U.S. intelligence officials warned last week that the threat of al Qaeda or other terrorist groups attacking the United States was still imminent and likely would be in the form of a car bomb or other low-tech weapon.

But they stressed that terror groups were trying to circumvent U.S. security measures and obtain weapons of mass destruction.

"It may be only a matter of time before al Qaeda or other groups attempt to use chemical, biological, radiological or nuclear weapons. We must focus on that," CIA Director Porter Goss told the Senate Intelligence Committee.

In his first public appearance as CIA director, Goss outlined international threats to the United States, including al Qaeda, whose leaders -- Osama bin Laden and Ayman al-Zawahiri -- still remain at large.

"Their capture alone would not be enough to eliminate the terror threat to the U.S.," Goss said.

He noted that, "In the past year, aggressive measures along with key international partners have, in fact, dealt serious blows to al Qaeda and other terror organizations."

FBI Director Robert Mueller also noted al Qaeda remains intent on attacking the United States on its own soil.

"Their intent to attack us at home remains -- and their resolve to destroy America has never faltered," Mueller said in his opening statement.

"While we still assess that a mass casualty attack using relatively low-tech methods will be their most likely approach, we are concerned that they are seeking weapons of mass destruction including chemical weapons, so-called 'dirty bombs' or some type of biological agent such as anthrax."

Adm. James Loy, the acting secretary of Homeland Security, said terror groups continue to seek weapons of mass destruction (WMD) and would use them against the United States if acquired. But he added that "we are most likely to be attacked with a vehicle-borne improvised explosive device (car bomb) because that's the weapon of choice around the world."

The intelligence officials attended the open Senate hearing to discuss international threats to the United States, as well as discuss the vacant position for director of national intelligence.

"I really expected that when this hearing came, the new director of national intelligence would be here to talk about threats," said Sen. Jay Rockefeller, D-West Virginia, the vice chairman of the intelligence committee.

"Two months have now passed since the bill signing ceremony and the position of director of national intelligence remains vacant, not even a person nominated. To me, this is unacceptable."

The committee chairman, Sen. Pat Roberts, R-Kansas, said while he shared Rockefeller's frustrations, he noted the importance of choosing the right person for the position.

"It is my opinion that the administration is also awaiting the report of the independent WMD commission, part of whose job or task is to take a look at the intelligence reform bill and make some recommendations," Roberts said.

Roberts noted that, under the bill, the Bush administration had until June 17 to appoint a director of national intelligence.



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